Blatant lying, relentless behaviour

Blatant lies drive me mad. Recently, my son requested a peanut butter lollipop. This is a treat in our house when Mommy is making a peanut butter sandwich. I scoop a generous portion of peanut butter onto a big spoon and each kid gets a peanut butter lollipop.

Well, I gave one to my son while I was working at the kitchen table and explained to him that when he was done, he could just put his spoon in the sink and go back to doing what he was doing because Mommy had to get some work done.

Well, after he finished, his sister asked for one. So, obliging mother that I am, I gave one to her. Only to have Little Brother tromp back into the kitchen adamant that he had not had one and that it was unfair that his sister got to have one. And he wouldn’t let.it.go. He was relentless.

(I’m starting to think relentlessness is his talent.)

But what irks me the most is the lying business. He knows he only gets one PB lollipop per day and he’d had his already. So, of course he’s going to tell me that he didn’t because he hasn’t figured out all the nuances of lying yet (thankfully) and he doesn’t realize that he can’t lie about something to the very person who provided that something.

What’s your experience with kids lying? Got any pointers on how to handle my little guy’s new found enthusiasm for untruths?

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8 thoughts on “Blatant lying, relentless behaviour

  1. memyselfandkids.com

    I like this from the very start. If I were remaking the food chart, peanut butter would be its own seperate food group. I would love a peanut butter lolly and treat myself to them on a semi regular basis. In addition, I eat a peanut butter sandwich every day at work.

    Reply
    1. Nancy Post author

      I must admit, I limit my kids’ consumption of it on a spoon, but they eat more peanut butter sandwiches than I can count. And, when they’re not looking, I eat peanut butter lollies dipped in melted chocolate…but don’t tell them that 😉

      Reply
  2. AlwaysARedhead

    If I remember correctly, when our kids were caught lying, then a time out ensued or something like that, it is a difficult road, but lying is a bad habit that does need to be punished in some sort of way.

    Reply
  3. tania2atee

    I once heard a great suggestion to stop the lying, which works with my eldest…I told her that a mark appears on her forehead when she lies that only mommies and daddies can see. For some reason, the thought of a mark on her forehead bothers her more than the lying…so she seemed to stop. (For the most part).

    Reply
  4. Shoes

    I have not had too much of a problem with my boys lying (yet, that is) but when it does come up we talk about how I may not like what they tell me, but they will not get in trouble for telling the truth, but if they lie their chances of getting time out increase. We have talked about trust and how lying makes me disappointed and sad. I don’t know how much of it sinks in for them.

    We do the spoon of peanut butter too although I have not thought of calling them lollys – I like it! 🙂

    Reply
    1. Nancy Post author

      Good advice! Thanks. I’ve talked with my kids about telling the truth and how they won’t get in trouble for being honest even if I don’t like what they are telling me. And for the big issues in life, I think they get it because they tend to be honest when I think they are going to lie (like when a lamp gets broken or some such thing). It’s these little tests when lying is inconsequential that I just don’t get.

      Reply

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